Working Waterfront Festival

The Working Waterfront Festival

Celebrating Commercial Fishing — America's Oldest Industry

Performers

See what you missed in 2013! Stayed tuned for details on 2014.

Ana Vinagre Ensemble

Ana Vinagre Ensemble

Ana Vinagre is one of the area's best known, and most respected Fadistas. Born in Portugal, she immigrated to New Bedford as a young woman with her husband Jose. Both had been members of folkloric dance and music ensembles and they have continued to perform at area Portuguese restaurants, community events, and in festivals and concerts around the nation. They take great pride in their culture and enjoy teaching American audiences about the tradition of Fado music, a genre that developed in the port city of Lisbon and was performed at waterfront clubs and bars frequented by sailors and seamen.

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Anita Best

Anita Best

Anita Best was born on the island of Merasheen in Placentia Bay on Newfoundland's south coast the year before Newfoundland joined Canada. When she was a child, television had not yet taken over as the primary source of entertainment, and for many homes on the island, electricity was provided by gas-powered generators. Singing, dancing and storytelling were the main forms of recreation and when the nights grew longer and colder and the fishing season was over, people would gather in each others homes and keep heart in one another with tunes, songs and stories. Anita performs the traditional songs and stories from her childhood, as well as ones she learned later from people in Bonavista Bay, Cape St. Georges and the communities in and around Gros Morne National Park. She also performs songs from Newfoundland's beloved contemporary songwriters, Pamela Morgan and Ron Hynes. With her rich voice and warm personality she builds a marvelous bridge between old-time and contemporary Newfoundland song-making and storytelling traditions. Anita has received several honors for her work in collecting and disseminating Newfoundland folksongs, including the Marius Barbeau award from the Folklore Studies Association of Canada and an Honorary Degree from Memorial University. She was named to the Order of Canada in 2011 and received the Queen's Jubilee Medal in 2013 for service to the community.

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Calico Jack

Calico Jack

Calico Jack is the dynamic folk duo of Janie Meneely and Paul DiBlasi, whose music celebrates the people, places and history of the Chesapeake. Singer/songwriter Janie Meneely delves deep into the well of Chesapeake lore to produce songs evocative of the waterman's way of life, and her nautically inspired tunes have been recorded by artists throughout the country. Paul DiBlasi adds his powerful vocals, including a penchant for harmony, plus a strong hand on the guitar. Meneely's strong regional roots have led her to develop a hefty list of Bay-inspired songs that trace the history of the oyster industry or capture the tales told round a country store liar's bench, but her ditties are just as apt to poke fun at time-honored traditions. Calico Jack is eelgrass at its best. Sometimes saucy, sometimes serious Calico Jack offers audiences a glimpse of a rapidly disappearing way of life and invites them to join in on the chorus.

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Crabgrass

Crabgrass

Daisy Nell, native of Essex, MA, mainstay of the shipbuilding industry for over 300 years, brings alive New England's maritime history through traditional songs of the sea. A familiar voice on the North Shore music scene, she is known for her broad repertoire of traditional folk, chanteys, and contemporary songs. Daisy appears regularly at the Essex Elementary School where she provides an annual residency in music and folklore. Her husband, Stan Collinson, (Captain Stan), adds his guitar and dobro to Daisy's banjo and guitar. Pat Conlon of Gloucester and Jack Schwartz, of Essex fill out the band. Together they cover a lot of territory, from the foc's'le to the farm!

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Charlotte Enoksen

Charlotte Enoksen

Charlotte Enoksen's father emigrated from Norway's Loften Islands and pursued the work of generations before him, owning two fishing vessels, F/V Porpoise and F/V Louise. Once married to a fisherman, Enoksen's poetry often reflects the lives of those left on shore. Her work is both creative and cathartic, a "song without accompaniment." Currently a social worker, Charlotte has also worked in journalism, advertising, public relations and fundraising.

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Dave Densmore

Dave Densmore

Dave grew up in Alaska, in several Aleutian villages, with Kodiak being home town. He's been a lifelong fisherman, earning a full share on a Kodiak seiner by the time he was twelve and purchasing his first boat soon after. He skippered his first Bering Sea King crabber at 23, the youngest Bering Sea king crab skipper, at that time. He has trolled the west coast for salmon and Albacore, otter trawled for bottom fish, and fished Alaska for Black Cod and Halibut, King Crab, Tanner and Dungeness Crab. He currently fishes salmon out of Kodiak AK, and is gearing up for crab.

Dave started writing poetry in the late 70's "long before I heard anyone else write anything about commercial fishing." He's been published in numerous trade papers, magazines and newspapers and has a byline in a quarterly, the Columbia River Gillnetter. He was featured in the documentary Fisherpoets and on Good Morning America. A regular at the Astoria Fisherpoet's Gathering, Dave has also performed in Elko Nevada at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering and at events from fish fries to a sculpture dedication for the world renowned artist Mia Lin.

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Janice Marshall

Janice Marshall

Janice Marshall has been at home on the only inhabited offshore island in Maryland's Chesapeake Bay since her ancestors settled here six generations ago. Her father, husband and son have all worked the water for crabs and oysters while she tended peelers (soft crabs) and picked hard crabs for the market. Of necessity, she founded the Smith Island Crabmeat Co-op that has employed dozens of island wives. It stands as the longest lived women's co-op in America. As a participant in Ladies Aid and Waterman's events she is known for her original musical parodies and presentations which involve many of the island's men and women in hilarious skits for the community and the public. Like most Smith Island cooks and bakers, she is well-known for her crabmeat creations and her ten layer cakes, now the official Maryland state dessert.

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Joanne Doherty

Joanne Doherty

Joanne Doherty combines her deft and delicate stylings on guitar and ukulele with a rich smooth voice. She spins her own magic on a wide variety of songs selected from an eclectic catalogue of folk, blues and old standards. A former member of the folk trio Tesseract, she has been featured at countless venues in the Massachusetts/Rhode Island folk music circuit.

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Joao Cerilo and Pilon Batuku

Joao Cerilo and Pilon Batuku

At ease with both traditional and popular music of the Cape Verde Islands, Joao Cerilo, accordionist and leader of Pilon Batuku regularly entertains large audiences at festivals and in the more intimate setting of local clubs. Joao grew up on Santiago, one of the Cape Verde islands where he learned to play ferinho (a percussive instrument made of an iron bar) and gaeta (accordion) as a young person. He performs the funana and batuko styles of Cape Verdean music, both of which have strong African roots. Funana is an accordion-based dance form, often employing vocal improvisation to comment on current events and history. Batuko, a call and response form was originally accompanied by rhythms beat out on sacks of flour held between the knees. In 1970, Joao left Cape Verde for Portugal where he studied music in Lisbon, learning guitar and keyboards and combining the traditional music of his homeland with more contemporary forms from around the world. Joao immigrated to Rhode Island in 1982. At the Working Waterfront Festival, he will be joined by several percussionists and two dancers.

We feature Cape Verdean music to honor the many ties Cape Verdean Americans have with the working waterfront. Many Cape Verdeans came to New Bedford aboard whaling ships during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Packet ships such as Schooner Ernestina shipped goods between New England and the Cape Verde islands, keeping these connections strong. As whaling ended, many Cape Verdeans found work as longshoremen, stevedores and merchant mariners.

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Jon Broderick and Jay Speakman

Jon Broderick and Jay Speakman

Jon Broderick and Jay Speakman have been playing original songs celebrating the commercial fishing industry for a decade, not only at the annual FisherPoets Gathering in Astoria, Oregon but at venues as varied as, among others, the Jack London Bar in Portland, Oregon, the Steam, Sail and Power Museum in Rockland, Maine and Kodiak Out Loud in Kodiak, Alaska. With over fifty seasons' commercial fishing experience (and counting) between them, Jon and Jay play honest songs with roots in authentic experience.

Jay packs about three dozen harmonicas and plays most of them during shows. He's a bluesman, he's a cowboy, he's a gypsy, he's a heavy-loaded freight train going up a steep hill, he's heavy traffic on El Camino Real. He writes lyrics that take listeners downeast to the mackereling and lobster grounds off the Maine coast, to the harbors and halibut grounds of the Gulf of Alaska. He gave us "Mechanico, the voice of NOAA weather radio" and the Skookum Troller who "cuts through the water like she's eatin' pie."

Jon's guitar and occasional old-time banjo playing keep the sound friendly and back porch. With melodies both manouche and American, his songs travel from the mudflats of Bristol Bay, through southeast Alaska's narrow channels, clear to the bistros of the Silicon Valley. He brings "Les Yeux Noirs" to the cannery, "Auld Lang Syne" to a distant Alaskan future and Texas swing to Nushagak Bay. If he pulls out his tin whistle, hold your breath.

In addition to recording two CDs, Pitched Off, Heading Home and Miles Away, Jon and Jay collaborated with Dallas, Oregon poet Clemens Starck on his CD Looking for Parts.

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Jon Campbell

Jon Campbell

When the Fisheries Scientists were beginning studies in Pt. Judith RI, they surmised that a steady diet of gurry and fish-heads must cause the ears of the stray cats to fall off. Little did they know that the truth was that the cats had chewed them off each other. Jon Campbell has told stories (not that one) and sung at venues as diverse as the Annapolis Maritime Museum, Kodiak High School Auditorium, Mystic Seaport, Mahogany Shoals on Block Island, the Jack London Bar in Portland OR, and the Astoria Fisherpoets' Gathering. He's got a bouzouki made in Glasgow, and tin-whistle made in County Clare, and stories and songs he's picked up from all over. A lot of them he has written himself, many about life along the New England coast. He recently tried a blueberry on a freshly opened oyster, hoping to make a culinary breakthrough. No such luck......

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Michael Troy

Michael Troy

Michael Troy was born and raised in the rough-and-tumble mill town of Fall River, Mass. In many ways, his life reflects the lives of the hard-working common folk who populate this part of New England. Having spent parts of his own life as a mill worker, fisherman, laborer and carpenter, and most of his adult years as a husband and father, Michael has traveled many paths, and the experience and wisdom he's gleaned along the way echoes through his music. His three recordings, Whispers in the Wind (2002), Romancing the Moon (2004), and Mill Town Boy (2009) celebrate the beauty and intrinsic value of hard work and perseverance, memory and history, love and friendship, and above all, survival

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New Bedford Harbor Sea Chantey Chorus

New Bedford Harbor Sea Chantey Chorus

Hosted and organized by the Schooner Ernestina, this 43-member chorus was created in 2001, and is made up of some of the Ernestina's most vocal volunteers. The repertoire includes a variety of chanteys and songs that reflect the rich maritime heritage of New Bedford, and the region. Sea Chanteys were traditionally sung as work songs on board sailing ships both as a way to pass the time and as a means of helping establish a rhythm for various types of work aboard the ship.

As a sampler of musical traditions connected to New Bedford Harbor and the New England seafarer, their performances feature the chanteys of the Yankee sailor, along with the ballads and ditties of global mariners and coastwise fisherfolk in North America, the Cape Verde Islands, and the British Isles.

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Sharks Come Cruisin'

Sharks Come Cruisin'

Sharks Come Cruisin' plays an energetic mix of original and traditional sing-along songs, keeping the themes of audience participation and celebration at the center of their music and live performances. SCC has played several festivals up and down the Eastcoast, from Florida to Maine. They have played with Dropkick Murphys, The Loved Ones (Fat Wreck Chords), and Lemuria (Bridge Nine Records). They have been compared to Flogging Molly, The Pogues, and Against Me! and have been described as sea shanty punk, Irish punk, and folk punk.

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The Souls of the Sea Trio

The Souls of the Sea Trio

The Souls of the Sea Band sings about the lives and experiences of the fishermen of the North Atlantic. The original, musically diverse songs are unique interpretations of life around the working harbor. The group of nationally acclaimed musicians, singers and songwriters are based in America's oldest seaport, Gloucester Massachusetts, and perform throughout the Northeast.

The trio consists of guitarist and lead singer Allen Estes, a long time performer and former songwriter for the Merit Music Corp in Nashville, TN; former Stompers lead guitarist, Sal Baglio, who has opened for The Beach Boys; and fiddle player Matt Leavenworth, whose virtuosity is legend throughout the New England states. Frank Tedesco writes the lyrics.

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Interested in performing or participating in the Festival?

The Festival features maritime and ethnic music that relates to the commercial fishing industry.

Send press packet and sample recording to:

Working Waterfront Festival
c/o CEDC
PO Box 6553
New Bedford, MA 02742-6553.